Life Day 24081: Ride To Work Day (Motorcycles)

June 17, 2013 at 12:05 am | Posted in Today's Reasons To Celebrate | 1 Comment

Today is Monday, June 17, 2013.
Good morning bikers. The first holiday today is Ride To Work Day (Motorcycles). Ride to Work Day is a holiday created to advocate commuting to work on a motorcycle or scooter. It is celebrated annually on the third Monday in June. Ride to Work Day was inspired by “Work to Ride – Ride to Work” marketing materials created between 1989 and 1991 by the Aero Design and Manufacturing Company, a Minnesota based manufacturer of motorcycle riders clothing. The first Ride to Work Day event date was July 22nd, 1992. For several years various motorcycle businesses informally promoted every third Wednesday in July as Ride To Work Day. These early advocates included Road Rider Magazine, Dunlop Tires, and Aerostich/Riderwearhouse. The event continued to grow as an informal grass roots demonstration every year until 2000. That year a non-profit organization, Ride to Work was formed to help organize and promote Ride to Work Day. The first Ride to Work Day event led by this group was the third Wednesday in July of 2001. This day was the annual day until 2008, when it was changed to the Third Monday In June. This change was made to climatically better accommodate riders worldwide, and to give more riders an opportunity to participate.

The only other ‘regular’ holiday today is another one of those sappy U. N. holidays of which I am so fond. It is World Day To Combat Desertification and Drought. I’m not going to waste my time, or yours, by expounding upon it. This link will give you more information on this holiday than anyone needs to know.

The first is food-related holiday today is Eat Your Vegetables Day. I’m noticing a trend here. Yesterday was Fresh Veggies Day. Eat Your Vegetables Day is always celebrated on June 17th. It was strategically created in the middle of National Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Month, and is the perfect opportunity to re-introduce a healthy portion of vegetables into your diet. This holiday was created to promote a more healthy diet. On this day, you are encouraged to eat vegetables for every meal, and for a snack. Any additional vegetables you eat today will count, and make you a little healthier as well. Parents are encouraged to let the kids help with dinner, preparing the salad and vegetables. Along the way, you tell your kids a little about the importance of vegetables for a long and healthy life.

The next food-related holiday is National Cherry Tart Day. Cherries are in season now, and what better way to enjoy some than in a delicious cherry tart? Tart shells are relatively easy to make yourself at home, or are readily available pre-made at any supermarket, so there is no reason not to enjoy a cherry tart for dessert tonight.
FACTOID: Maraschino Cherries are not a variety of cherry. Rather, Maraschino cherries are cherries that have been processed, akin to pickling. Also, take note, Maraschino is pronounced mara-SKEENO, not mara-SHEENO.

The third food-related holiday today is  National Apple Strudel Day. Strudel is a  sweet layered pastry with a filling that became very popular in the latter part of the Habsburg Empire (1278-1780). The oldest strudel recipe is a handwritten recipe from 1696, now kept in the Vienna City Library. There are sweet and savory strudels. Popular sweet varieties include apple (often with raisins), cherry, cheese and poppy seed; savory varieties include spinach and cabbage. Although associated with the Austro-Hungarian Empire, strudel has its origins in Byzantine Empire pastries such as baklava. While some people make strudel from phyllo or puff pastry, traditional strudel pastry dough is a very elastic and stretchable, not flaky dough. Supermarket products known as “toaster strudel” bear no similarity to a real strudel (or even food in my humble opinion).

The final food-related holiday today is Stewart’s Root Beer Day. Stewart’s Root Beer was created in 1924 by Frank Stewart, a schoolteacher in Mansfield, Ohio. Stewart set out to create the world’s creamiest, best tasting root beer. He and a chemist specially formulated the root beer, blending 20 different extracts of roots, herbs, and berries to create the world-famous Stewart’s Root Beer. For the first 66 years, Stewart’s Root Beer was only available at Stewart’s root beer stands and later, at Stewart’s Drive-Ins. In 1990, Cable Car Beverage Corporation acquired the bottling rights for Stewart’s and began selling Stewart’s Root Beer in 12-oz. amber glass bottles. Since then, Stewart’s has continued to grow. Throughout the 1990s with the introduction of flavors like the Country Orange n’ Cream, Stewart’s emerged as the leader in flavor innovation for the super-premium, gourmet soda category. In November of 2000, Stewart’s was sold along with Royal Crown and Snapple Brands to Cadbury Schweppes. Today, Stewart’s is part of Plano, Texas-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group, an integrated refreshment beverage business marketing more than 50 beverage brands throughout North America. If you can find it, enjoy a cool refreshing glass of Stewart’s Root Beer today, or better yet, throw in a scoop of ice cream and make a  root beer float. If you can’t find it in your locale, tough toenails! Don’t even think of celebrating this holiday with any other brand.

On this date in 1876 – General George Crook’s command was attacked and defeated on the Rosebud River by 1,500 Sioux and Cheyenne under the leadership of Chief Crazy Horse.
Also on this date in history:
1579 – Sir Francis Drake claimed San Francisco Bay (California) for England.
1856 – The Republican Party opened its first national convention in Philadelphia.
1861 – President Abraham Lincoln witnessed Dr. Thaddeus Lowe demonstrate the use of a hydrogen balloon.
1879 – Thomas Edison received an honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the trustees of Rutgers College in New Brunswick, NJ.
1885 – The Statue of Liberty arrived in New York City aboard the French ship “Isere”.
1913 – U.S. Marines set sail from San Diego to protect American interests in Mexico.
1928 – Amelia Earhart began the flight that made her the first woman to successfully fly across the Atlantic Ocean.
1930 – The Smoot-Hawley Tariff Bill became law. It placed the highest tariff on imports to the U.S.
1932 – The U.S. Senate defeated the bonus bill as 10,000 veterans massed around the Capitol.
1941 – WNBT-TV in New York City, NY, was granted the first construction permit to operate a commercial TV station in the U.S.
1942 – Yank, a weekly magazine for the U.S. armed services, began publication. The term “G.I. Joe” was first used in a comic strip by Dave Breger.
1944 – The republic of Iceland was established.
1950 – Dr. Richard H. Lawler performed the first kidney transplant in a 45-minute operation in Chicago, IL.
1963 – The U.S. Supreme Court banned the required reading of the Lord’s prayer and Bible in public schools.
1982 – Former U.S. President Richard M. Nixon was interviewed by Diane Sawyer on “The CBS Morning News.”
And, in 1991 – The Parliament of South Africa repealed the Population Registration Act. The act had required that all South Africans for classified by race at birth.

If you were born on this date, you share a birthday with the following list od distinguished individuals.
John Wesley 1703 – Christian theologian.
Igor Stravinski 1882 – Composer.
Ralph Bellamy 1904 – Actor.
Red Foley 1910 – Country singer.
Peter Lupus 1932 – Bodybuilder, actor.
Newt Gingrich 1943 – Politician.
Barry Manilow 1943 – Musician.
Joe Piscopo 1951 – Comedian, actor.
Mark Linn-Baker 1953 – Actor.
Thomas Haden Church 1961 – Actor.
Greg Kinnear 1963 – Actor, television personality.
Jason Patric 1966 – Actor.
Will Forte 1970 – Actor, comedian.
And finally, Venus Williams 1980 – Tennis player.

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  1. […] a couple of root beer-related holidays this year; National Black Cow Day on June 10th, and Stewart’s Root Beer Day on June 17th, so National Root Beer Float Day may seem familiar to you, but this holiday […]

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