Life Day 25032: Dagnabbit, Ya’ll Better Be Readin’ This Here Consarned BLOG

January 24, 2016 at 12:01 am | Posted in Today's Reasons To Celebrate | Leave a comment

Greetins’ ya grizzled ol’ galoots. Today is January 24th. In case you ain’t figgerd it out yet, the first “hollyday” today is Talk Like A Grizzled Prospector Day. The reason fer this here “hollyday” is cuz a gal dang feller name o’ James Marshall came upon a whole passel of gold whilst strollin’ around up near Sutter’s Mill, Californee on this very date in 1848. Afore ya knew it, purt near every sidewinder who could straddle a horse was headin up thataway ta cash in on tha bonanza.

If’n ya’ll ain’t familiar with grizzled ol’ prospector yak, here’s some lingo ta hep ye git started:

  • Hornswaggler – A dirty, thieving swindler.
  • Bushwhacker – One of the roughest, toughest outlaws around who just waits fer ya to pass by so’s they can jump on ya.
  • Californee – The best darn state in the Union.
  • By cracky – Sumpthin that’s awful important and needs to be done right now.
  • Dadgum – What you say when you’re mighty annoyed at sumphtin or someone. Makes a right nice change from Dagnabbit and Goldurn.
  • Confounded – What ya say when things just don’t make no sense. Also comes in handy when you stub your toe.
  • Varmint – a small animal or a person you don’t care for very much.
  • Consarn it! – Sumpthin a real lady would never say.
  • Sockdolager – What done settle the matter once and for all.
  • Sidewinder – The kind of low down snake that will come on all nice like just so’s he can jump your claim.

If’n yer at work today, don’t let that befuddle ya none. Here’re some ways ya kin speechify just like a grizzled ol’ prospector even if’n yer at work:

  • If’n yer a salesperson at an Electronics Store, ya could say somethin’ like,  “Yup ya whippersnapper!  We got a whole passel o’ them new-fangled computator boxes rite over yonder on that thar table. Belly up to one an’ give ‘er a go.”
  • If’n yer one of them thar Psychiatrist type fellas,  ya could say somethin’ like, “So dadgummit, how’d it make ya feel to git raised up by a pappy who’s a hornswogglin’, ornery, goldurn four-flusher?”
  • If’n yer in law enforcement, ya could say somethin’ like, “Awright ya mange-ridden varmint, what in tarnation possessed you to drygulch my deputy? Ya got 2 choices: Either ya come along peaceable like, or I leave ya pushin’ up daisies. Now, which’ll it be, give up an’ let me haul ya to tha hoosegow, or do I fill ya full o’ lead, an’ leave yer carcass fer the kyotes?”

I could go on with this list indefinitely, but fortunately for you, I won’t. To celebrate this holiday, take some time to learn about early California history, and particularly, about the Gold Rush era. Watch a movie such as  “Treasure of the Sierra Madre”, or watch some old TV westerns, or better yet, watch a whole passel of “Yosemite Sam” cartoons.

The next “holiday” on today’s list is National Compliment Day.  “Thank you for reading my BLOG, you must really have a taste for the finer things in life.” — “Your intelligence  is only surpassed by your natural beauty…both internal and external. — “It is always so lovely where you live…especially this time of year.” — “And, by the way, I must make mention you on your choice of attire today, it’s perfect for the occasion.”
National Compliment Day  encourages you to go out of you way to be complimentary to people today…You should be doing that anyway. Your mother probably told you that,  “If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything”. If, after an exhaustive search, you simply can’t find something complimentary to say about someone, then the old adage “silence is golden” applies. It is important that your compliments be sincere. People can see right through insincerity. And, please don’t go “fishing” for compliments yourself. That’s just tacky.

The next”holiday” on the list today  is Beer Can Appreciation Day. On this date in 1935, the first canned beer went on sale to the general public in Richmond, Virginia. The brewer was Krueger’s Brewery. Kegs are too bulky. Bottles are subject to breakage and may require the help of an opener. But cans, well they’re just about the perfect vessel for the one of the world’s favorite beverages. There is a burgeoning market for collecting beer cans. Collectors meticulously open a beer can from the bottom, empty it (and drink the beer, of course), then wash and dry it. For beer can collectors, there is no shortage of types of beer, cans and bottles, and sizes. Some collectors have hundreds of different cans and bottles from all over the world.
Beer Can Appreciation Day provides the opportunity to enjoy and appreciate the many different kinds of beer, and cans. Enjoy today by starting a beer can collection of your own, or by adding to your already existing collection. As you empty the new cans you should, naturally, drink the contents. “Waste not, want not”!

WARNING: Please drink responsibly. Consumption of alcoholic beverages to excess has been shown to cause dizziness, blurred vision, slurred speech, and stupidity in human life forms. (If you don’t believe me, just watch an episode of the TV show “Cops”).

The last “holiday” that I will cover today is Belly Laugh Day. Belly Laugh Day is a day for having a good chuckle at anything at all. Laughter has been known to causes the tissue lining our blood vessels to expand increase blood flow. This, in turn, makes you feel more positive, boosts your immune systems and generally just makes us feel happier. Anticipating a good laugh has nearly the same positive effects as laughing itself. It reduces stress and increases chemicals that help relaxation. According to Readers Digest, “Laughter is the Best Medicine”. This axiom is certainly pertinent today. Nothing improves your spirits like laughter, so try to make someone laugh today…and don’t forget to laugh yourself.

Below is a list of “holidays” today which are worthy of mention, but not necessarily worthy of comment. As always, a link is provided for you if you are interested in finding more information about them.

The first food-related “holiday” today is National Peanut Butter Day. Peanut butter is a staple in over 90% of American households and the average person consumes more than six pounds of peanut products each year. Women and children prefer creamy peanut butter while most men go for the chunky variety. A doctor in St. Louis created peanut butter in 1890 as a remedy for bad teeth. It became very popular with the doctor’s patients, but the oil often separated from the grainy solids. In 1933, a California packer was able to homogenize the peanuts into a spreadable butter.
It takes 550 peanuts to make a 12-ounce jar of peanut butter. Peanuts are cholesterol free and an excellent source of protein. In fact, it’s the high protein content that causes peanut butter to stick to the roof of your mouth. To celebrate National Peanut Butter Day, bake some peanut butter cookies, spread some tasty peanut butter on toast, make a PBJ sandwich, or enjoy a spoonful (or two, or three… right out of the jar.

Another food-related “holiday” today is Eskimo Pie Day. On this date in 1921, Christian K. Nelson received a patent for the Eskimo Pie. He found a way to cover an ice cream bar with a thin coating of chocolate and viola, the Eskimo pie was born. It started out as a local favorite in Owana, Iowa, Nelson’s hometown town, but soon spread nationwide to become one of America’s favorite ice cream treats. If you can find the time in your busy schedule of celebrations today, treat yourself to one.

The last food-related “holiday” today is Lobster Thermidor Day. Lobster Thermidor is a delicious lobster dish that is surprisingly simple to make. Lobster shells are stuffed with cooked lobster in a creamy white wine sauce, then topped with Parmesan cheese and broiled until golden. If you’re feeling special today, and why wouldn’t you be, you might want to give this rich, extravagant dish a try. Recipes are available from many websites on the internet (just ‘Google’ it), or treat yourself to a special night out.

On this date in 1848 – James W. Marshall discovered a gold nugget at Sutter’s Mill in northern California. The discovery led to the gold rush of ’49.
Other significant events which occurred on this date are:
In 1899 – Humphrey O’Sullivan patented the rubber heel.
In 1908 – In England, the first Boy Scout troop was organized by Robert Baden-Powell.
In 1924 – The Russian city of St. Petersburg was renamed Leningrad. The name has since been changed back to St. Petersburg.
In 1943 – President Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Churchill concluded a wartime conference in Casablanca, Morocco.
In 1955 – The rules committee of major league baseball announced a plan to strictly enforce the rule that required a pitcher to release the ball within 20 seconds after taking his position on the mound.
In 1964 – CBS-TV acquired the rights to televise the National Football League’s 1964-1965 regular season. The move cost CBS $14.1 million a year. The NFL stayed on CBS for 30 years.
In 1965 – Winston Churchill died at the age of 90.
In 1972 – the U.S.  Supreme Court struck down laws that denied welfare benefits to people who had resided in a state for less than a year.
In 1978 – A nuclear-powered Soviet satellite plunged through Earth’s atmosphere and disintegrated. The radioactive debris was scattered over parts of Canada’s Northwest Territory.
In 1980 – The United States announced intentions to sell arms to China.
In 1985 – Penny Harrington became the first woman police chief of a major city. She assumed the duties as head of the Portland, OR force of 940 officers and staff.
In 1986 – The Voyager 2 space probe flew past Uranus. The probe came within 50,679 miles of the seventh planet of the solar system.
In 1989 – Ted Bundy, the confessed serial killer, was put to death in Florida’s electric chair for the 1978 kidnap-murder of 12-year-old Kimberly Leach.
In 1990 – Japan launched the first probe to be sent to the Moon since 1976. A small satellite was placed in lunar orbit.
In 1995 – The prosecution gave its opening statement at the O.J. Simpson murder trial. (And Judge Ito lost control thereof).
In 2000 – The Supreme Court upheld a Missouri law that limited the contributions that individuals could donate to a candidate during a single election.
In 2001 – In Colorado Springs, CO, Patrick Murphy Jr. and Donald Newbury were taken into custody after a 5-minute phone interview was granted with a TV station. They were the remaining fugitives of the”Texas 7″.
In 2002 – Congress began a hearing on the collapse of Enron Corp.
In 2002 – John Walker Lindh appeared in court for the first time concerning the charges that he conspired to kill Americans abroad and aided terrorist groups. Lindh had been taken into custody by U.S. Marines in Afghanistan.
And finally, in 2003 – The Department of Homeland Security began operations under Tom Ridge.

***New Feature***
Henceforth, notes in parenthesis after a name in the ‘celebrity birthday’ section of this BLOG will be a ‘clickable link’. You will be able to glean additional information regarding why that person deserves to be on the list. — Example: Ann Todd 1909 (actress)

If you were born on this date, you share a birthday with the following celebrities:
Hadrian AD 76 (Roman emperor)
Frederick the Great 1712 (King of Prussia)
Edith Wharton (Jones) 1862 (novelist)
Ann Todd 1909 (actress)
Ernest Borgnine 1917 (actor)
Oral Roberts 1908 (televangelist)
Maria Tallchief 1925 (PrimaBallerina)
Marvin Kaplan 1927 (character actor)
Doug Kershaw 1936 (country singer/songwriter)
Ray Stevens 1939 (comedic country singer/songwriter)
Neil Diamond 1941 (musician, singer, songwriter)
Aaron Neville 1941 (singer, musician)
Sharon Tate 1943 (actress)
Julie Gregg 1944 (actress)
Warren Zevon 1944 (singer/songwriter)
John Belushi 1949 (comedian, actor)
Michael Ontkean 1950 (actor)
Yakov Smirnoff 1951 (comedian)
Elaine Giftos 1954 (character actress)
Nastassja Kinski 1961 (actress)
And finally, Mary Lou Retton 1968 (Olympic Gymnast)

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: