What’s the Word #20 – Absquatulate

March 19, 2016 at 12:02 am | Posted in Today's Reasons To Celebrate | Leave a comment

The word for today is absquatulateI chose this word because it is fun to say. I learned it about 10 years ago, before I retired as an over-the-road truck driver, while reading an online dictionary out of sheer boredom while waiting to be unloaded at a customer.

Absquatulate is a verb which means to flee; leave abruptly; skedaddle; abscond; decamp hurriedly. Other forms of the word are absquatulated and absquatulating, both verbs, and absquatulation and absquatulator, both nouns.

Examples:

  1. The thieves tried to absquatulate with the jewels but were soon apprehended by the police.
  2. Ernie found that he didn’t fit in with the crowd at the party and absquatulated as soon as he could.
  3. Before absquatulating, Ernie made sure to grab some snacks and a couple of sodas.
  4. The absquatulation of the contractor left the homeowners in a financial bind.
  5. The idiot, jewel-thieving absquatulators were apprehended in Mexico, where they were living the high-life, and were extradited back to stand trial.

Absquatulate originated in the early 19th century: pseudo-Latin: possibly a combination of abscond and perambulate.
1837, “Facetious U.S. coinage, perhaps rooted in mock-Latinnegation of squat “to settle.” Said to have been used by the U.S. Western character “Nimrod Wildfire” in the play “The Kentuckian,” as re-written by British author William B. Bernard and staged in London in 1833.

 

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