A CAPITAL IDEA

June 28, 2016 at 12:01 am | Posted in Today's Reasons To Celebrate | Leave a comment

GOOD MORNING LOVERS (OR HATERS) OF IMPROPER CAPITALIZATION.  TODAY IS TUESDAY, JUNE 28TH. THE HOLIDAYS TODAY ARE:

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY 

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY IS AN ENTIRE DAY DEDICATED TO A PRACTICE THAT DRIVES NORMAL PEOPLE BONKERS — PEOPLE WHO TYPE IN ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. THIS HOLIDAY WAS CREATED IN 2000 BY DEREK ARNOLD OF IOWA. IT WAS INTENDED TO POKE FUN AT THOSE INDIVIDUALS WHO UNNECESSARILY CAPITALIZE LETTERS, WORDS, PHRASES, SENTENCES, OR ENTIRE PARAGRAPHS.
THE HOLIDAY BECAME SO POPULAR WITH INTERNET USERS THAT IT IS NOW CELEBRATED TWICE A YEAR: ON JUNE 28TH AND AGAIN ON OCTOBER 22ND.
SO, HIT YOUR CAPS LOCK KEY AND TYPE TO YOUR HEARTS CONTENT. USE IT ESPECIALLY TO ANNOY YOUR FRIENDS ON THE SOCIAL MEDIA SITES WHERE THIS EGREGIOUS ABUSE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE IS MOST COMMON — TWITTER AND FACEBOOK.
OK, I’m done with this.

Tau Day

I don’t know how many of you actually celebrated Pi Day with me on 3/14, but if you did, you’ll enjoy Tau Day twice as much.
But, you may be asking yourselves about now, “What the Heck is Tau?” Well, in 2001, Bob Palais published the article “π Is Wrong” in which he argued that the beloved constant π is the wrong choice of circle constant. He instead proposed using an alternate constant equal to 2π, or 6.283… to represent “1 turn”, so that 90 degrees is equal to “a quarter turn”, rather than the seemingly arbitrary “one-half π”.
In 2010, Michael Hartl published “The Tau Manifesto” echoing the good points made by Palais and building on them by calling this “1 turn” constant τ (tau), as an alternative to π. Tau is defined as the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its radius, not its diameter and is equal to 2π.
Since Tau is approximately equal to 6.28, that makes today, June 28th (6/28), Tau Day. You can celebrate Tau Day by eating twice as much pie as you did on Pi Day (3/14). Who says that change isn’t good…literally.

Paul Bunyan Day 

Paul Bunyan is one of the best-known heroes in American folklore. This legendary lumberjack (and his faithful companion Babe the Blue Ox) starred in many of the “tall tales” told in the Midwest during the 1800’s.
According to the stories, Bunyan was a giant man with incredible physical strength. He single-handedly established the logging industry, cleared North and South Dakota of its forests for farming, scooped out Lake Superior to water Babe, and even trained carpenter ants to help his fellow loggers. It is said that Minnesota’s 10,000 lakes were created by Babe’s footprints. The general theme of all of these folktales dealt with absurdly severe weather conditions and fearsome wild beasts. Even the etymology of the name Paul Bunyan is unknown, but many think it could have been related to the Québécois expression “bon yenne!” that expresses surprise or astonishment.
French Canadians were believed to have originated the Paul Bunyan tales during the Papineau rebellion of 1837.  While he may have been created in Canada, Paul Bunyan quickly became a huge American legend. Many of the tales of Paul Bunyan originated in lumberjack industry and logging communities. Like all good folklore, it was passed from generation to generation by word of mouth. Over campfires, his legend grew, and tales were created.
A young woman named K. Bernice Stewart was the first person to write down the original Bunyan tales. Stewart collected the stories from local loggers while studying at the University of Wisconsin in 1914. Paul Bunyan was further popularized by freelance writer and advertising guru William B. Laughead (1882–1958) in a 1916 promotional pamphlet for the Red River Lumber Company who was looking for a face for the advertising campaign. Laughead embellished greatly on the character’s older exploits and added some of his own, such as Paul Bunyan’s pet blue ox, “Babe”. The writer also increased Paul Bunyan’s body to impossible proportions.
Today, Paul Bunyan is mentioned in more than 1,000 books and has become one of the most widespread icons in American culture. No data is available to explain why Paul Bunyan Day is celebrated on this particular date.

Insurance Awareness Day 

Gee! Do you think that this holiday is sponsored by the Insurance industry? Insurance is nothing more than a legally sanctioned form of gambling. If you buy insurance, you are gambling that something will go wrong. If you don’t buy insurance, you are gambling that something will not go wrong. Insurance, whether life, homeowners, automobile, or disaster (flood, fire, tornado, etc, etc,) offers peace of mind that in the event something does occur, you will be financially protected. Life situations change over time. Inflation, additional children, or children growing up and starting their own lives, can affect the type and amount of coverage you need.
To celebrate this holiday, take time today to review all the insurance coverage that you have and make sure it is still adequate for your needs. You might be able to reduce or eliminate some coverages and save a little money – much to the chagrin of your Insurance agent.

National Tapioca Day 

When most people, including me, see the word tapioca, they immediately think of pudding, but actually, tapioca is a gluten-free starch with myriad uses worldwide.
Tapioca is extracted from the Manioc plant, otherwise known as ‘Cassava’.  Its origins can be found in Brazil, where the cassava plant is called the mandioca, and it’s extracted starch is called Tapioca. One little-known fact about the Tapioca starch is that when it is extracted from the green branched variety of the plant, it is the source of a potent cyanide-based poison, and must be processed to remove this before it becomes edible. Once this process is completed it is processed in different ways, which produces the fine or coarse flakes or flour/meal, tiny round pearls, powder and rectangular sticks.
Tapioca is a flavorless, colorless, odorless starch and it is most used worldwide as a thickening agent. The products are traditionally white, but sticks and pearls may be colored brown or vibrant pastels. The form of tapioca most familiar to American consumers is white pearl tapioca. All forms except flour and powder must be soaked prior to cooking, to rehydrate them; they absorb water equal to twice their volume or more. In all forms, tapioca is opaque before cooking; after cooking it becomes translucent.

National Ceviche Day 

Ceviche (pronounced say-VEE-chay), is shellfish cured by acidic citrus juice. Ceviche has been popular in Latin America for centuries, particularly Peru – so basically, it’s Peruvian sushi. In the early 1500’s, the Spanish conquistadors wrote of an Incan dish of raw fish marinated in chicha, a fermented maize beer that dates back some 2,000 years. The concept evolved into ceviche raw fish or shellfish cured with citrus juice.
A chemical process occurs when the fish/shellfish is marinated in the highly acidic citrus juice, which denatures the protein. The result is similar to what happens when the fish is cooked with heat. Instead of “cooking,” however, the fish is cured in the marinade, which adds its own delicious flavors.
Both Ecuador and Peru claim to have originated ceviche: Both were part of the Incan Empire. Today, ceviche is so popular that there are “cevicherias” – restaurants that specialize in ceviche. The Spanish brought the lime and onion that is integral to modern ceviche. In fact, the term ceviche is thought to come from the Spanish escabeche – meaning marinade. Others argue that the word ceviche comes from the Quechua (Incan) word siwichi—abut that word couldn’t be documented in Quechua dictionaries. There’s a whole menu of ceviche, from types of fish and seafood to country-specific preparations. Each country adds its own spin based on local seafood and preference for ingredients, like avocado.
Because of my dislike of seafood in general, I will not be celebrating this holiday.

International Body Piercing Day

 

On this date in

  • 1776 – American Colonists repulsed a British sea attack on Charleston, SC.
  • 1778 – Mary “Molly Pitcher” Hays McCauley, wife of an American artilleryman, carried water to the soldiers during the Battle of Monmouth and, supposedly, took her husband’s place at his gun after he was overcome with heat.
  • 1894 – Congress made Labor Day a U.S. national holiday.
  • 1902 – Congress passed the Spooner bill, it authorized a canal to be built across the isthmus of Panama.
  • 1911 – Samuel J. Battle became the first African-American policeman in New York City.
  • 1914 – Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, was assassinated in Sarajevo along with his wife, Duchess Sophie. This incident was the start of WWI. Exactly five years later, on this date in 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed ending World War I. The treaty also established the League of Nations.
  • 1938 – Congress created the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) to insure construction loans.
  • 1939 – Pan American Airways began the first regularly scheduled transatlantic passenger service.
  • 1942 – German troops launched an offensive to seize Soviet oil fields in the Caucasus and the city of Stalingrad.
  • 1945 – General Douglas MacArthur announced the end of Japanese resistance in the Philippines.
  • 1950 – North Korean forces captured Seoul, South Korea.
  • 1954 – French troops began to pull out of Vietnam’s Tonkin Province.
  • 1960 – In Cuba, Fidel Castro confiscated American-owned oil refineries without compensation.
  • 1964 – Malcolm X founded the “Organization for Afro-American Unity” to seek independence for blacks in the Western Hemisphere.
  • 1965 – The first commercial satellite began communications service. It was Early Bird (Intelsat II).
  • 1967 – Israel formally declared Jerusalem reunified under its sovereignty following its capture of the Arab sector in the June 1967 war.
  • 1971 – The Supreme Court overturned the draft evasion conviction of Muhammad Ali.
  • 1972 – President Nixon announced that no new draftees would be sent to Vietnam.
  • 1976 – The first women entered the United States Air Force Academy.
  • 1978 – The Supreme Court ordered the medical school at the University of California at Davis to admit Allan Bakke. Bakke, a white man, argued he had been a victim of reverse racial discrimination.
  • 1996 – The Citadel voted to admit women, ending a 153-year-old men-only policy at the South Carolina military school.
  • 1996 – Charles M. Schulz, the creator of the “Peanuts” comic strip, got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • 1997 – Mike Tyson was disqualified for biting Evander Holyfield’s ear after three rounds of their WBA heavyweight title fight in Las Vegas, NV.
  • 2000 – The Supreme Court declared that a Nebraska law that outlawed “partial birth abortions” was unconstitutional. About 30 U.S. states had similar laws at the time of the ruling.
  • 2000 – Six-year-old Elián González returned to Cuba from the U.S. with his father. The child had been the center of an international custody dispute.
  • 2001 – Slobodan Milosevic was taken into custody and was handed over to the United Nations war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands. The indictment charged Milosevic and four other senior officials, with crimes against humanity and violations of the laws and customs of war in Kosovo.
  • 2001 – The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit set aside an order that would break up Microsoft for antitrust violations. However, the judges did agree that the company was in violation of antitrust laws.
  • 2004 – The United States turned over official sovereignty to Iraq’s interim leadership. The event took place two days earlier than previously announced to thwart insurgents’ attempts at undermining the transfer.
  • 2007 – The American bald eagle was removed from the endangered species list.

Celebrity Birthdays:

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