CAPS LOCK, Tau, Paul Bunyan, Insurance, Ceviche, and Tapioca

June 28, 2021 at 12:01 am | Posted in Today's Reasons To Celebrate | Leave a comment

According to the National Day Calendar, there are more than 1500 national holidays every year – meaning that there is at least one holiday for every day in the calendar year. All you have to do is choose which holiday(s) you want to celebrate. With that said, today’s holidays are listed below — so let the festivities begin. 

GOOD MORNING LOVERS (OR HATERS) OF IMPROPER CAPITALIZATION. TODAY IS MONDAY, JUNE 28, 2021. TODAY IS THE 179TH DAY OF THE YEAR, AND 186 DAYS REMAIN.

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY 

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY IS CELEBRATED ANNUALLY ON JUNE 28TH. YOU NEEDN’T BE A GRAMMARIAN TO DEDUCE THAT THIS HOLIDAY IS AN ENTIRE DAY DEDICATED TO A PRACTICE THAT DRIVES NORMAL PEOPLE BONKERS — PEOPLE WHO TYPE IN ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. THIS HOLIDAY WAS CREATED IN 2000 BY DEREK ARNOLD OF IOWA. IT WAS INTENDED TO POKE FUN AT THOSE INDIVIDUALS WHO UNNECESSARILY CAPITALIZE LETTERS, WORDS, PHRASES, SENTENCES, OR ENTIRE PARAGRAPHS.
THE HOLIDAY BECAME SO POPULAR WITH INTERNET USERS THAT IT IS NOW CELEBRATED TWICE A YEAR: ON JUNE 28TH AND AGAIN ON OCTOBER 22ND.
SO, HIT YOUR CAPS LOCK KEY AND CELEBRATE INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY BY TYPING TO YOUR HEARTS CONTENT. USE IT ESPECIALLY TO ANNOY YOUR FRIENDS ON SOCIAL MEDIA SITES – WHERE THIS EGREGIOUS ABUSE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE IS MOST COMMON.

Tau Day 

Tau Day is celebrated annually on June 28th (6/28). I don’t know how many of you actually celebrated Pi Day with me on 3/14, but if you did, you’ll enjoy Tau Day twice as much.
You may be asking yourselves about now, “What the Heck is Tau, and why does it deserve its own holiday?”
Well, in 2001, Bob Palais published the article “π Is Wrong” in which he argued that the beloved constant π is the wrong choice of circle constant. He instead proposed using an alternate constant Tau – which is equal to 2π, or 6.283… or approximately equal to 6.28,  to represent “1 turn”, so that 90 degrees is equal to “a quarter turn”, rather than the seemingly arbitrary “one-half π”.
In 2010, Michael Hartl published “The Tau Manifesto” echoing the good points made by Palais and building on them by calling this “1 turn” constant τ (tau), as an alternative to π. Tau is defined as the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its radius, not its diameter, and is equal to 2π.
You can celebrate Tau Day by learning more about this new mathematical constant – or, by eating twice as much pie as you did on Pi Day (3/14). Who says that change isn’t good –literally.

Paul Bunyan Day 

Paul Bunyan Day is celebrated annually on June 28th. You don’t need to be a woodsman to ascertain that this holiday celebrates Paul Bunyan – one of the best-known heroes in American folklore. This legendary lumberjack (and his faithful companion Babe the Blue Ox) starred in many of the “tall tales” told in the Midwest during the 1800s.
According to the stories, Bunyan was a giant man with incredible physical strength. He single-handedly established the logging industry, cleared North and South Dakota of its forests for farming, scooped out Lake Superior to water Babe, and even trained carpenter ants to help his fellow loggers. It is said that Minnesota’s 10,000 lakes were created by Babe’s footprints. The general theme of all of these folktales dealt with absurdly severe weather conditions and fearsome wild beasts.
The etymology of the name Paul Bunyan is unknown, but many think it could have been related to the Québécois expression “bon yenne!” that expresses surprise or astonishment.
French Canadians were believed to have originated the Paul Bunyan tales during the Papineau Rebellion of 1837.  While he may have been created in Canada, Paul Bunyan quickly became a huge American legend. Many of the tales of Paul Bunyan originated in the lumberjack industry and logging communities. Like all good folklore, it was passed from generation to generation by word of mouth. Over campfires, his legend grew, and tales were created.
A young woman named K. Bernice Stewart was the first person to write down the original Bunyan tales. Stewart collected the stories from local loggers while studying at the University of Wisconsin in 1914. Paul Bunyan was further popularized by freelance writer and advertising guru William B. Laughead (1882–1958) in a 1916 promotional pamphlet for the Red River Lumber Company who was looking for a face for the advertising campaign. Laughead embellished greatly on the character’s older exploits and added some of his own, such as Paul Bunyan’s pet blue ox, “Babe”. The writer also increased Paul Bunyan’s body to impossible proportions.
Today, Paul Bunyan is mentioned in more than 1,000 books and has become one of the most widespread icons in American culture. No data is available to explain why Paul Bunyan Day is celebrated on this particular date.
To celebrate Paul Bunyan Day, relate a few of your favorite Paul Bunyan tales to your children or grandchildren to perpetuate the legend of this mythical giant.

Insurance Awareness Day 

Insurance Awareness Day is celebrated annually on June 28th. As you might expect, this holiday seeks to raise awareness about the need for the different types of insurance you may need in case of an unforeseeable event.
In my humble opinion, Insurance is nothing more than a legally sanctioned form of gambling. If you buy insurance, you are gambling that something will go wrong. If you don’t buy insurance, you are gambling that something will not go wrong. Insurance, whether life, homeowners, automobile, or disaster (flood, fire, tornado, etc, etc,) offers peace of mind that in the event something does occur, you will be financially protected. Life situations change over time. Inflation, additional children, or children growing up and starting their own lives, can affect the type and amount of coverage you need.
To celebrate Insurance Awareness Day, take time today to review all the insurance coverage that you have and make sure it is still adequate for your needs. Who knows, you might be able to reduce or eliminate some coverages and save a little money – much to the chagrin of your Insurance agent.

National Ceviche Day 

National Ceviche Day is celebrated annually on June 28th. While the word ceviche (pronounced say-VEE-chay) may sound like a type of gourmet French cheese, in actuality, it is a type of uncooked seafood cured by acidic citrus juice that is popular in Latin America for centuries – so basically, it’s just Latin American sushi.
A chemical process occurs when the fish/shellfish is marinated in the highly acidic citrus juice, which denatures the protein. The result is similar to what happens when the fish is cooked with heat. Instead of “cooking,” however, the fish is cured in the marinade, which adds its own delicious flavors.
Both Ecuador and Peru claim to have originated ceviche: Both were part of the Incan Empire. Today, ceviche is so popular that there are “cevicherias” – restaurants that specialize in ceviche. The term ceviche is thought to come from the Spanish escabeche – meaning marinade. Others argue that the word ceviche comes from the Quechua (Incan) word siwichi—but that word couldn’t be documented in Quechua dictionaries. There’s a whole menu of ceviche, from types of fish and seafood to country-specific preparations. Each country adds its own spin based on local seafood and preference for ingredients, like avocado.
Because of my dislike of seafood in general, I will not be celebrating this holiday. However, if you like sushi, celebrate National Ceviche Day by giving ceviche a try – if you can find a restaurant that serves it.

National Tapioca Day 

National Tapioca Day is celebrated annually on June 28th. It takes little imagination to conclude that this holiday celebrates tapioca. When most people, including me, see the word tapioca, they immediately think of tapioca pudding, but actually, tapioca is a gluten-free starch with myriad uses worldwide.
Tapioca is extracted from the Manioc plant, otherwise known as ‘Cassava’.  Its origins can be found in Brazil, where the cassava plant is called the mandioca, and its extracted starch is called Tapioca. One little-known fact about the tapioca starch is that when it is extracted from the green branched variety of the plant, it is the source of a potent cyanide-based poison, and must be processed to remove this poison before it becomes edible. [How many people died before they figured that out, I wonder]? Anyway, once this process is completed it is processed in different ways, which produces fine or coarse flakes or flour/meal, tiny round pearls, powder, and rectangular sticks.
Tapioca is a flavorless, colorless, odorless starch and it is most used worldwide as a thickening agent. The products are traditionally white, but sticks and pearls may be colored brown or vibrant pastels. The form of tapioca most familiar to American consumers is white pearl tapioca. All forms except flour and powder must be soaked prior to cooking, to rehydrate them; they absorb water equal to twice their volume or more. In all forms, tapioca is opaque before cooking; after cooking it becomes translucent.
To celebrate National Tapioca Day, simply enjoy some tapioca today. The easiest way is to simply make some tapioca pudding. But, if you’re feelig adventurous, do a simple Google search and find other ways to enjoy your tapioca today.

Listed below are some other holidays celebrated on this date that deserve mention.

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